Monet’s Water Lilies inspired paper flowers

Monet’s Water Lilies inspired paper flowers

Sarah Yakawonis, 1985-

2017

Paper flowers

Water Lilies

Claude Monet (1840-1926)

1922

Oil on canvas

Toledo Museum of Art

When you think of the most famous floral painting, Monet’s water lilies will always rank among the top. I knew I wanted to recreate them in paper flowers, the challenge came with selecting which one. Monet painted over 300 canvases full of his tranquil pond at Giverny, his home. I spent countless hours searching for the right one. I decided to base my paper recreation on a painting held by the Toledo Museum of Art because of its size at  79 in. (200.7 cm) by 84 in. (213.3 cm) it one of the smaller water lily paintings he produced. He also gave more details to the water lilies in this painting than some, giving me more detail to obsess over and incorporate into my flowers. 

If you are unfamiliar with making paper flowers you might not notice how different the paper I use for my flowers is. Traditionally paper flowers are made out of crepe paper or tissue paper. While these papers do make amazing flowers I have never been satisfied with how flat the colors seem. When tackling such a masterpiece a single color would have never worked. It needs those colors, it needs those brush strokes. The paper in this kit allows all of those details so that they not only represent water lilies but evoke Monet’s water lilies.

I have turned my paper flowers into kits because I believe that art is for everyone and everyone is an artist. I’ve taken my expertise as a paper flower artist and concentrated it into kits that provide everything needed to make paper flowers with an unparalleled level of detail. My kits are a fresh way to connect with the world of fine art and have flowers that will last for years. They allow people to skip the years of work and get right to the good stuff, connecting with the joy of making something with their hands. 

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